Henri Lannoye (1946-2006), Dutch sculptor, born October 30, 1946 in Aardenburg (Sluis-Aardenburg, Zeeland) – deceased April 12, 2006 Bornem, Belgium. From 1967 living in Belgium.

Education: Academy Tilburg
After his studies he worked as an apprentice to, inter alia, Marino Marini in Rome. In 1967 he moved to Bruges, to settle permanently in Belgium then. From 1969 he lived and worked in Bornem. Henri Lannoye chosen deliberately for the bronze. It is for him a challenge to master these tough matter to the smallest detail, in which chance is excluded. A frequently recurring theme in his sculptures is the symbiosis between man and technology. Thus, the human figures he designs machines and take the machines he invents anthropomorphic forms. Curbing of this dizzying technological development fascinates him to the frightening increasing.

Henri Lannoye was best known for his monumental bronze sculptures; the Prancing Horse “Horse Power” at the entrance to the Wellington Hippodrome in Oostende (cfr. illustration below) was created by him. Lannoye in 1998 founded the association Monumental on which he wanted to promote the monumental sculpture and he also opened a studio in Bornem, a sculpture garden and a gallery.

Work
Lannoye’s earlier sculptures in stone, reminiscent of Henry Moore’s work. After 1970 he performs his works in bronze and developed a more personal style, in which the influence of Moore and to a lesser extent, clearly visible by Umberto Boccioni. In the 90s Lannoye gave preference to his images to be polished smooth and apply a smooth, consistent lines and styling. Lannoye was fascinated by the theme of ‘technology’. The most famous example, he created in 1997 ‘Horsepower’; a seven-meter-high equestrian horse that graces the Wellington Racetrack in Ostend.

On June 5, 1998, the image ‘Don Pedro Coloma’ unveiled in Bornem. In 2000 he starts working on the image ‘Falcon’, a falcon with a wingspan of almost eleven meters, the figurehead should have been the city of Dubai. He was unable to complete his untimely death. – (Source: wikipedia.org)

Henri Lannoye 1